Breakthrough: Scientists Discovered How to Use Seaweed to Power a Car

WHAT’S BEING CLAIMED:

  • Scientists in Denmark recently announced that they have discovered a way on how to use seaweed fuel to power an automobile.
  • Using a biofuel from seaweed that was created by a Dutch company, the researchers achieved speeds of 50 mph (80 kph)  while driving the car.
  • Manufactured from garbage or the agricultural byproducts from growing crops like sugar, corn, and soya, biofuels are one of the largest sources of clean renewable energy today —contributing to energy security while also reducing carbon emissions.

Danish researchers recently announced they have used a seaweed fuel to power an automobile, achieving speeds of 50 mph (80 kph), using a biofuel created by a Dutch company.

“We’ve looked to see if seaweed fuel works in the same way as ordinary fuel and what its effect is on the motor,” research team leader Jaap van Hal told Noordhollands Dagblad, a Dutch newspaper.

Produced from garbage or the agricultural byproducts from growing crops like sugar, corn, and soya, biofuels are one of the largest sources of clean renewable energy used today.  is biofuels. Biofuels contribute to energy security while also reducing carbon emissions.

Within Europe’s transportation sector the vast majority of renewable energy-powered solutions utilize these land-based sources of biofuel. However it requires land, fertilizer, and irrigation resources to produce these biofuels, so Europe is looking largely towards ocean-based sources of biofuel—namely algae and seaweed, which only need saltwater and sun to grow.

Dr. van Hal says learning to manage a 10-acre seaweed farm is similar to managing a 1,000-acre farm. To turn seaweed fuel into a reality, though, requires a supply on a “huge scale”. Even though one farm is currently a “dot on the horizon”, Van Hal is nevertheless excited to move forward.

Van Hal is the scientific coordinator for EU-funded MacroFuels, aiming to create an entire industry around seaweed biofuels that includes cultivation and production and testing—specifically for heavy machinery like trucks and ships with diesel engines.

Several other European firms are looking into increasing the proliferation of seaweed or algae biofuels for the EU energy sector.

Norway, for instance, is plotting a similar course, with a startup called Alginor planning the creation of a bio-refinery for seaweed and algae growing in the North Sea.

 

Source: Good News Network

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