Linkin Park protests about Trump’s fan-made ad video using its “In The End” hit song

WHAT’S BEING CLAIMED:

  • On Saturday, fans of Linkin Park were outraged upon discovering that President Donald Trump retweeted a fan-made campaign ad video containing the alternative rock band’s hit song “In The End.”
  • Linkin Park condemned Trump’s use of its music, tweeting that the band “did not and does not endorse Trump, nor authorize his organization to use any of our music. A cease and desist has been issued.”
  • Twitter had pulled out the campaign ad after receiving a Digital Millennium Copyright Act notice from Linkin Park’s music management.

President Donald Trump’s retweet of a fan-made re-election campaign ad that used Linkin Park’s music earned the ire of alternative rock band’s fans. The fans discovered the tweet on Saturday and argued that the band’s lead singer, the late Chester Bennington, was strongly against the incumbent president.

Tweeted on Friday by White House social media Director Dan Scavino, the two-minute ad video ran Linkin Park’s 2002 hit “In the End” mash-up song cover by Fleurie and Jung Youth with audio from Trump’s 2017 inaugural address. The video also depicted former Vice President Joe Biden, Trump’s presidential rival, as a member of the “Washington elite.”

Through the band’s official twitter account, other Linkin Park members expressed their rage against the use of their music and said that “Linkin Park did not and does not endorse Trump, nor authorize his organization to use any of our music. A cease and desist has been issued.”

The infamous video was pulled out on Twitter within hours after Linkin Park’s tweet. The social media company disabled the ad after receiving a Digital Millennium Copyright Act notice from Machine Shop Entertainment, Linkin Park’s owned management company. In an email statement to Reuters, a Twitter representative said: “We respond to valid copyright complaints sent to us by a copyright owner or their authorized representatives.”

The controversial video displayed a new error notification that reads: “This media has been disabled in response to a report by the copyright owner.”

Linkin Park is just one of the many musicians who had opposed the use of their music by Trump in his campaigns. In his recent rallies, the president also received complaints from Neil Young and the Rolling Stones upon using their songs “Rockin in the Free World” and “You Can’t Always Get What You Want” ⏤ although such use of music at renowned venues that obtain public performance licenses with organizations like ASCAP, BMI, and SESAC is normally legal even with no consent from music artists.

However, according to Kevin Erickson, director of the Future of Music Coalition, playing music in a campaign ad requires license approval, which is also the case for any kind of advertisement regardless if it’s officially or unofficially made by the party it represents.

Source: AOL.com

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