Man’s ‘rugby injury’ turned out to be breast cancer after 30 years

WHAT’S BEING CLAIMED:

  • A former rugby player was shocked when he was told he had breast cancer.
  • Angus McKay thought he just aggravated an old rugby injury from 30 years ago.
  • McKay had a full left mastectomy to remove the lump on his breast.

A former rugby player was shocked when he was told he had breast cancer.

Angus McKay thought he just aggravated an old rugby injury from 30 years ago. He thanks his wife for saving his life when she pushed him to have the lump in his chest checked out.

The 50-year-old dad had noticed a bulge on his left chest when he was a teen but thought he got it from playing contact sports.

Last year, he would wake in the night with a burning sensation and spotted the lump had grown.

He told the Daily Record: “I mentioned it to my wife because her mum had gone through two rounds of breast cancer and she said ‘well, let’s get it checked’.

“I absolutely credit her for saving my life. I was in two minds whether or not to say anything at all to her and just leave it.”

McKay’s GP ordered him to have a mammogram last November. He then had biopsies taken before doctors told him he has “oestrogen-sensitive cancer”.

McKay was stunned: “I was vaguely aware men could get breast cancer but just thought it was so rare that it was unlikely to really be me.

When he told some of his friends about his diagnosis, they were like ‘but you’re a bloke?’

“They believed me straight away but they were just shocked to comprehend that men could get it. I think quite a few of my friends didn’t know that men could get breast cancer.

McKay realized that men can get and advise others to not ignore lumps and bumps.

“Rather get it checked out and find it’s nothing to worry about than thinking ‘oh, it’s nothing’ and finding out too late it was something to worry about,” the dad-of-two said.

McKay had a full left mastectomy to remove the 24mm lump. Thankfully, it didn’t need radiotherapy or chemotherapy. His doctors recommended he have checkups every year. He also needs to take a drug for breast cancer treatment for five years.

It’s a common myth that breast cancer is a female-only disease.

Know the warning signs of breast cancer and learn how to perform a male self-breast exam.

Source: New York Post

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