strawberry moon

Tips to watch 2021’s last supermoon, the strawberry moon

WHAT’S BEING CLAIMED:

  • The last supermoon of the year will illuminate the night sky this week.
  • June’s full moon is called the strawberry moon to signify the harvest of strawberries in some parts of North America during this time of year.
  • Its peak illumination will start on Thursday, June 24, at 2:40 p.m. ET, and will be more visible after it rises above the horizon later in the evening.

This year has been a treat to stargazers and moon watchers so far, with the previous lunar eclipse, partial solar eclipse, and supermoons. This week will feature the year’s last supermoon, however, when the night sky will be illuminated by the full “strawberry” moon.

When the moon is at its perigee, or its nearest point to Earth in its orbit, it appears slightly bigger and brighter than the usual full moon, which is how it gets the name “supermoon.”

There is still some debate on whether June’s full moon is counted as a supermoon, however, since there is no official classification of a supermoon yet.

Gordon Johnston of NASA explained, “For 2021, some publications consider the four full Moons from March to June, some the three full Moons from April to June, and some only the two full Moons in April and May as supermoons.”

The full moon in June is usually called the strawberry moon. The name was coined by Native American tribes to signify the harvest of strawberries in some parts of North America during this time of year, the Farmer’s Almanac noted. The color of the moon may not match its name, however.

The strawberry moon usually signals the end of spring and the start of summer. According to the Farmer’s Almanac, it has several other names: birth moon, blooming moon, egg laying moon, green corn moon, hatching moon, hoer moon, honey moon, and mead moon.

This moon may perhaps be called the “honey moon” due to it being the “sweetest” moon of the year or the tradition of marrying in June.

How to watch the strawberry moon

The moon will appear full for about three days, starting on Wednesday morning through Saturday morning. But its full brightness will be seen on Thursday, June 24, at 2:40 p.m. ET, particularly after it rises above the horizon later in the evening.

Check out timeanddate.com to find out your location’s exact moonrise and moonset times.

If you want to witness the event but don’t have a clear view of the night sky, you can still watch it live on Virtual Telescope Project‘s livestream of the strawberry moon over Rome on June 24, starting at 3 p.m. ET.

 

Source: CBS News

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *