Nike sues Lil Nas X’s ‘Satan shoes’

Nike sues Lil Nas X’s ‘Satan shoes’

WHAT’S BEING CLAIMED:

  • After receiving backlash from the public, Nike filed a complaint against Lil Nas X’s ‘Satan Shoes.’
  • The shoemaker argued that the release of the devil shoes has tainted the company and the Nike brand.
  • The sneakers, with only 666 pairs, were sold out in just a minute for $1,018 each.

Nike sued Lil Nas X following his revelation of ‘Satan Shoes,’ arguing that the company does not, in any way, support or tolerate satanism.

The shoemaker filed a lawsuit against MSCHF, the creative agency that designed the custom Air Max 97s. The limited-edition shoes were released in 666 pairs together with Lil Nas X’s ‘Montero (Call Me By Your Name),’ his new single.

“In the short time since the announcement of the Satan Shoes, Nike has suffered significant harm to its goodwill, including among consumers who believe that Nike is endorsing satanism,” the company wrote in the suit filed on Monday in Brooklyn federal court.

Included in the complaint were online comment screenshots from customers, saying that they would never again patronize Nike products because of its ‘devilish’ marketing. Another customer described the scheme as “pure evil.”

“MSCHF is deceiving consumers into believing that Nike manufactures or approves of the Satan Shoes, and consumers’ belief that the Satan Shoes are genuine Nike products is causing consumers to never want to purchase any Nike products in the future,” the lawsuit reads.

When the project went public, the Oregon-based company quickly distanced itself from the partnership. Consumers, however, did not believe that Nike did not participate in the development since its signature swoosh logo was attached to the shoes.

Nike argued that MSCHF built the shoes in a way “that they constitute new, unauthorized products,” even if the shoes were an authentic Nike brand.

The suit pursues a court ruling that would compel MSCHF to turn over the shoes “for destruction.” It also seeks to restrict the agency from selling or shipping the sneakers, aside from demanding financial damages for putting the company in a bad light.

The sneakers, which quickly became sold out with a price tag of $1,018, were decorated with an inverted cross, pentagram pendants, and soles which were believed to have a drop of human blood.

Around 7:30 am on Tuesday, Nike’s shares dropped at 0.4 percent with a $133.00 value per stock in premarket trading.

The MSCHF has not given an immediate response to a request for comment on Tuesday.

Source: New York Post

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